Sunday Church School begins Sunday, September 11, 2016

9:45 – 10:40 a.m.

Classes for all, birth through age 100+

Wanting to register for Sunday Church School? Fill out our Sunday School Registration (download it from document library) and bring it with you to church! 

All are invited and welcomed to attend classes. Families are encouraged to attend a worship service and Sunday Church School together. We look forward to seeing you!

SCS is designed to help children, youth, & adults know and interpret the Bible, understand the church’s teachings, strengthen ties of Christian fellowship in the family of God, explore current issues and develop attitudes and skills in living the Christian faith.

Key areas of learning for each age group are: the Bible, Lutheran doctrine, faith and life, health and wholeness, home and community and the world. All materials are age-appropriate, progressive, structured learnings.

Saint Matthew’s Sunday Church School begins with our Nursery class for those children from birth to age 2. We continue with classes for each age/grade up through our High School Class.

CHILDREN’S SUNDAY CHURCH SCHOOL TEACHERS 2016

3 & 4 year olds                                    Barb Bell, Emily Carr

Kindergarten & 5 year old                 Dave & Barb Carr

Grades 1 & 2                                       Kim Lawton, Tessa Wise, Joan Schoof

Grades 3 & 4                                       Doug Baumgardt & Helen Baumgardt, Sue Orndorff

Grade 5                                               Andrew & Beth Malakoff

Grade 6 – 8                                          Jeff Bushmire, Janelle Jampole

High School                                        Sarah Wright, Karen Moler

 


Sunday Church School ~ Adult Classes

ten commandments Telushkin

The Ten Commandments of Character:

Essential Advice for Living an Honorable, Ethical, Honest Life Paperback– by Joseph Rabbi Telushkin 4

“Train up a child in the way he should go; even when he is old he will not depart from it.” (Proverbs 22:6.)

This year’s beginning discussions promise to be lively as the Parenting and Family Life class discusses the book, The Ten Commandments of Character: Essential Advice for Living an Honorable, Ethical, Honest Life, by Joseph Rabbi Telushkin.

Many of us are finding it increasingly hard to tread the fine line between right and wrong, and yet “a generation of children raised in a morally neutral environment will yield a society where no truths can be held as self-evident.”  Through astute and warmhearted counsel on many of life’s most difficult ethical dilemmas, Joseph Telushkin outlines his ten commandments of character, explaining why each one is so vital.

Here’s an example in answer to a father’s letter: “My son’s Little League coach plays his own kid at first base, even though my 10-year old son is a more talented first baseman. I know that the father’s a volunteer and gives lots of his time, but shouldn’t he play the kids on the basis of talent, not nepotism?” Whether related to children, family, community or work these perplexing issues crop up more often than we would anticipate. (Consider for instance, the incident of Olympic swimmer Ryan Lochte who falsely claimed he had been robbed by armed men with police badges. “The unwillingness to make ethical behavior one’s supreme value leads many otherwise admirable people to advocate or do despicable things.”)

In The Ten Commandments of Character, Telushkin faces these issues squarely and shows us how to live a life of true integrity.

Randy and Shannon Moler, Mary Catherine Deadman ~ 2nd Floor Education Wing


reformation-image

The Reformation: 500 Years of  Dangerous Ideas

October 17, 2017 will mark the 500th anniversary of a monk’s nailing a notice on a church door and unleashing some very Dangerous Ideas – salvation by grace, justification by faith alone, the priesthood of all believers, every Christian an interpreter of Scripture.  Join us on the Road to Reformation, which begins earlier than most people realize, and explore these ideas, the people who thought them, and their impact on the religion, society, culture, politics, and economy of early modern Europe and of the world down to the 21st century.  Open your Bible, study history, live dangerously!

 Mark Victorson  ~ 2nd Floor Education Wing


DTH_TheGospels

Drive Thru History – The Gospels

Our Adult Sunday School class for the 2016-2017 church year will feature the Drive Thru History – The Gospels video series that tells the story of Jesus from the actual Holy Land locations featured in the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John.

During the 18 thirty-minute videos in this class, we will explore more than 50 ancient sites in the Holy Land by delving into the history, archaeology, geography, and art surrounding the birth, ministry, death, and resurrection of Christ from the actual places where Jesus lived, traveled, and taught.

Steve and Nancy Zimmerman ~ Conference Room


 Faith-Film

Faith and Film

This year we will continue to explore The Apostles’ Creed through film.  The Creed is an affirmation of what we as Christians believe. But the Creed is also communal. We are sharing a larger story when we confess the Creed. We will continue with, “Was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended to the dead.”  Each week we will watch a portion of a movie related to the section of the Creed. Following each section we have discussion of its meaning toward understanding the Creed and relating it to or lives.
Film offers us a creative language—an imaginative language of movement and sound—that can bridge the gap between the rational and the aesthetic, the sacred and the secular, the church and the world, and thereby throw open fresh new windows on a very old gospel.
There is no single person, entity, organization, institution, or power in our society today that even comes close to rivaling the power of film and television to shape our faith, values, and behavior. Learning to live and think as Christians in our time requires learning to engage media and culture as Christians. Together we must become aware of the power of images and find both the tools to explore and critique these images as well as the opportunities to shape that which so thoroughly shapes us.

Sabrina and Mark Chandler ~ Fellowship Hall